In This Sweeping Epic Of The Northernmost American Frontier, James A Michener Guides Us Through Alaska S Fierce Terrain And History, From The Long Forgotten Past To The Bustling Present As His Characters Struggle For Survival, Michener Weaves Together The Exciting High Points Of Alaska S Story Its Brutal Origins The American Acquisition The Gold Rush The Tremendous Growth And Exploitation Of The Salmon Industry The Arduous Construction Of The Alcan Highway, Undertaken To Defend The Territory During World War II A Spellbinding Portrait Of A Human Community Fighting To Establish Its Place In The World, Alaska Traces A Bold And Majestic Saga Of The Enduring Spirit Of A Land And Its People Praise For Alaska Few Will Escape The Allure Of The Land And People Michener Describes Alaska Takes The Reader On A Journey Through One Of The Bleakest, Richest, Most Foreboding, And Highly Inviting Territories In Our Republic, If Not The World The Characters That Michener Creates Are Bigger Than Life Los Angeles Times Book Review Always The Master Of Exhaustive Historical Research, Michener Tracks The Settling Of Alaska In Vividly Detailed Scenes And Well Developed Characters Boston Herald Michener Is Still, Sentence For Sentence, Writing S Fastest Attention Grabber The New York Times


10 thoughts on “Alaska

  1. Duane Duane says:

    I always feel like I learned something after I have read a Michener novel That was the case with Alaska The isolation and vastness of the of the place is inconceivable to my mind Michener goes a little ov...


  2. Adam Adam says:

    Spanning almost 30,000 years, this book is the definition of epic historical fiction Beginning with the migration of mastodon and saber toothed tigers from Siberia to Alaska across the Bering Land Bridge and continuing forward to the signing of the Alaska Statehood Act that made Alaska the 49th state in 1959, the history of the nations largest state is laid out in surprisingly readable fashion I now wish there were equally good books on each of the other U.S states I ve never read anything b Spanning almost 30,000 years, this book is the definition of epic historical fiction Beginning with the migration of mastodon and saber toothed tigers from Siberia to Alaska across the Bering Land Bridge and continuing forward to the signing of the Alaska Statehood Act that made Alaska the 49th state in 1959, the history o...


  3. Joel Neff Joel Neff says:

    Epic, as a description, is thrown around far too often these days So often, in fact, that the meaning has been diluted down to where it is used only to describe a long story.Alaska, by James Michener is not just a long story Rather, Alaska is an epic in the original sense a story that is told over the course of epochs, involving generations of characters and genealogies The story begins with the forming of the continent of North America and takes the reader through modern times Along the w E...


  4. Dani Dani says:

    The first five hundred pages of this brick of a book were informative and entertaining enough to get me over the half way hump, but it quickly became less of a page turner andof a slog I think sometimes that updating my progress on Goodreads isof a motivator to make it through a book than actually reading it Is that a sign If your goal is to tell the entire cultural history of a place in a novel telling it through individual narratives might not be a bad way to do it, especial The first five hundred pages of this brick of a book were informative and entertaining enough to get me over the half way hump, but it quickly became less of a page turner andof a slog I think sometimes that updating my progress on Goodreads isof a motivator to make it through a book than actually reading it Is that a sign If your goal is to tell the entire cultural history of a place in a novel telling it through individual narratives might not be a bad way to do it, especially if you re trying for 29 weeks on the national best...


  5. Laura Laura says:

    Just arrived from Germany through BM.Page 141 Thus the great expedition proposed by Vitus Bering staggered to an inconclusive ending No officer had set foot on Alaska proper the scientific excursions had been aborted no useful charting was done and fifteen men had already been lost The adventure which Bering had said could be completed for ten thousand rubles would ultimately consume the two million predicted by the accountants, and all that would have been proved which was not already know Just arrived from Germany through BM.Page 141 Thus the great expedition proposed by Vitus Bering staggered to an inconclusive ending No officer had set foot on Alaska proper the scientific excursions had been aborted no useful charting was done and fifteen men had already been lost The adventure which Bering had said could be completed for ten thousand rubles would ultimately consume the two million predicted by the accountants, and all that would have been proved which was not already known was that Alaska existed and Terra da Gama did not.Page 170 Before Cook, a British warship could leave England with four hundred sailors and expect one hundred and eighty to be dead by the time the voyage was over, and sometimes the toll reached t...


  6. Michael Bass Michael Bass says:

    For two months the author took me on a journey, soaring over majestic mountains and ice crusted seas I was immersed in the history of the people and their ways and shown both sides of what happens when cultures clash Alaska unforgiving and brutal to those who don,t follow her rules but a gem to behold for those who take the chance to know her I probably read an additional three books of info online just following up on some of the topics the author went over in the book The closest you can g For two months the author took me on a journey, soarin...


  7. Rex Fuller Rex Fuller says:

    This is a novelcorrection, a saga, built from about three novels and four novellas But it s not pure fiction A number of events and characters are historical and a section in the front tells you which are which Both an education and a real pleasure, if you like Alaska and of course everybody does this is probably a must read.Michener chronicles the history of Alaska the accretion of land to form it arrivals of Athabascans, Eskimos, Aleuts, Russians, and Americans the fur trade the This is a novelcorrection, a saga, built from about three novels and four novellas But it s not pure fiction A number of events and characters are historical and a section in the front tells you which are which Both an education and a real pleasure, if you like Alaska and of course everybody does this is probably a must read.Michener chronicles the history of Alaska the accretion of land to form it arrivals of Athabascans, Eskimos, Aleuts, Russians, and Americans the fur trade the gold rushes the Klon...


  8. Janie Janie says:

    What a tremendous book Five stars for it and Michener And five stars for me LOL , the plodding reader, for finishing this in five weeks I ve always had to break up books over 600 700 pages and read something in between because my interest flags, but not with this...


  9. Suzanne Suzanne says:

    You can tell it s the holiday season, because I finished reading this book a week ago and it s taken me until now to write my review And, did I mention it took me about three weeks to finish it Well, it IS a Michener novel, which means not only is it really, really long, but happily, it s really, really engaging as well When I began Alaska, I tried to recall some history of the state, to predetermine what Michener might include in the book All I could come up with was gold, oil and cruise shi You can tell it s the holiday season, because I finished reading this book a week ago and it s taken me until now to write my review And, did I mention it took me about three weeks to finish it Well, it IS a Michener novel, whi...


  10. Bill Hunter Bill Hunter says:

    The first two chapters are pretty brutal, but apparently that is Michener They talk about the geological formation of Alaska and though detailed and informative can be skipped Once he gets into the third chapter following a pack of mammoths and the life of a salmon things pick up a bit but the book still drags a bit As Michener gets into the human portion of the novel it gets muchreadable The book follows interwoven characters and stories some historical figures and some fictional fig The first two chapters are pretty brutal, but apparently that is Michener They talk about...