A group of American scientists are rushed to a huge vessel that has been discovered resting on the ocean floor in the middle of the South Pacific What they find defies their imaginations and mocks their attempts at logical explanation It is a spaceship of phenomenal dimensions, apparently, undamaged by its fall from the sky And, most startling, it appears to be at least three hundred years old The suspense is real THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW A page turnerChichton s writing is cinematic, with powerful visual images and nonstop action This book should come with hot buttered popcorn NEWSWEEK


10 thoughts on “Sphere

  1. Mario the lone bookwolf Mario the lone bookwolf says:

    Very much yada yada, humanities vs natural sciences and a wasted plot idea with far too less action and twists.I still remember how boredom and disappointment grew, after the first few chapters showed the setting and some suspense was built up and then it got lengthy and neither the psychological inner character plot nor the other big mystery plot made much fun or sense, especially because the logic of motivations and thinking capacities and abilities of the protagonists were average.Some seem Very much yada yada, humanities vs natural sciences and a wasted plot idea with far too less action and twists.I still remember how boredom and disappointment grew, after the first few chapters showed the setting and some suspense was built up and then it got lengthy and neither the psychological inner character plot nor the other big mystery plot made much fun or sense, especially because the logic of motivations and thinking capacities and abilities of the protagonists were average.Some seem to see some kind of deeper philosophical meaning in this one, especially towards the end with something one could call a subtle plot twist, but to me, it was a too constructed, not well designed novel It tried to be mindfu ing, but the realization was poor.Possibly, in its time, when there were not much of similar techno and science thriller works with Sci Fi elements for a broader audience, it could have been seen as not so bad because of a lack of alternatives, but especially compared with what today s genre writers produce on a yearly basis and very high level, it sucks I especially have to laugh about the psychological thriller argument that was used to sell it, because Crichton s characterization and dialogues are so terrible in this one.Tropes show how literature is conceptualized and created and which mixture of elements makes works and genres unique


  2. Alejandro Alejandro says:

    Back in 1993, after reading Jurassic Park see review of that book HERE , I was like in Crichton mode actived So, my next novel had to be by Michael Crichton I went to the bookstore and this one was the first book that I checked and after reading the premise, I found it promising So, I bought it and started to read it.WoW Since the beginning I was in shock amalgamated with happiness since the style and mood of the novel was astonishing good Of course, by then I hadn t read yet Back in 1993, after reading Jurassic Park see review of that book HERE , I was like in Crichton mode actived So, my next novel had to be by Michael Crichton I went to the bookstore and this one was the first book that I checked and after reading the premise, I found it promising So, I bought it and started to read it.WoW Since the beginning I was in shock amalgamated with happiness since the style and mood of the novel was astonishing good Of course, by then I hadn t read yet The Andromeda Strain, so the idea of gathering a group of expert scientist to deal with something alien was something new for me P I don t know if happens to you, that sometimes if you are reading a novel that it hasn t being made into a film yet I read the novel like 5 years before to be poorly adapted to a movie sometimes I imagined some actor or actress to play the role of the character in my mind, an amusing thing was by then, in 1993, Sharon Stone was in hype due films like Basic Instinct and Sliver , so when I imagined some actress to fill my image of Dr Beth Halperin, I thought in Sharon Stone that she eventually got the role Honest to God True story Curiously, 5 years later, Sharon Stone wasn t in hype any so, knowing that she was casted in the role that I pictured in my mind was amusing but odd at the same time.I didn t picture Dustin Hoffman for the role of Dr Goodman, no offense to Mr Hoffman, which is an actor that I admired a lot, but I thought in Sean Connery for that character.Anyway, the film was a big dissapointment for me since it was very poor adaptation to such excellent book, so if you ever watched the film and you didn t like it, don t worry, that s normal, but please , if that s the reason that you haven t read this novel yet, please go and read it Of course, if you have the luck of not having watched the film, please, PLEASE, don t watch it I can assure you that the novel is way, way, WAY , better in infinite ways than that mediocre film.I already mentioned the style and mood of the book, I just want to take the topic again to mention that it was a thrilling experience, since you feel that the story is taken very seriously from the scientific angle.All the journey and process of exploring the alien ship is brilliant, you feel that you are there, down in the bottom in the ocean with them, walking with them.There is a major spoiler in this book, that I won t comment here, don t worry, but please avoid at all costs to know that spoiler if you choose to read the book, since it s that kind of spoilers that if you already knew it before of reading the book, simply you will ruin all the fun of actually reading the book and making the investigation along with the scientist group.If you like sci fi book and or techno thriller novels, this is a GREAT option.Highly recommended


  3. Jamie Jamie says:

    First, an overlong apologist s review of Michael Crichton Then, a very short review of Sphere Life update I am procrastinating.In my opinion, you can only truly rate a Michael Crichton book by a the depth and originality of the concept and b the lucidity of the monologue essay that will always occur, usually as a rant from some broken visionary genius or another, approx 4 5 of the way through the book Rating Michael Crichton on his prose, either its subtlety or execution, is sort of po First, an overlong apologist s review of Michael Crichton Then, a very short review of Sphere Life update I am procrastinating.In my opinion, you can only truly rate a Michael Crichton book by a the depth and originality of the concept and b the lucidity of the monologue essay that will always occur, usually as a rant from some broken visionary genius or another, approx 4 5 of the way through the book Rating Michael Crichton on his prose, either its subtlety or execution, is sort of pointless there s no doubt that this man is a shitty prose writer, short on synonyms and prone to spend most of his energy on frenetic descriptions of action He s basically writing scripts which is why the man gets the Dan Brown money, but no respect from the smarties So in the man s defense Michael Crichton is not really a writer, he s an idea man, and that s what attracted me to him in the first place, way back at age eleven He s the first person I know of since maybe Jules Verne or H.G Wells to do high quality sci fi thought experiments, almost always focused on some aspect of humanity s inexorable progress In his better books, these are made farinteresting by the aforementioned monologue essay This is a hat trick I ve never seen another writer skilled or not employ so effectively these speeches almost always provide a genuinely surprising counterpoint, and reframes the innovations Crichton describes in terms of different core needs So suddenly the Timeline is not about BS quantum physics, it is about the rising social need for authenticity Lost World is not about cashing in on the notion of cloning again its about successful species as extinction level events These speeches are usually so tightly written in comparison to the rest of the text that I ve started to think that Michael Crichton starts with them, and build a plot out afterwards Sphere is, in my opinion, Michael Crichton s most interesting book on two levels First, the plot a truly great parable on the endgame of technology, and the long sought after dream of Alladin s magic lamp I don t want to go too deep, but I ll say that it is, in my humble hypothesis, the uncredited inspiration for the excellent show Lost While the plot is a highlight, I personally keep this book high on my list of favorites, after all these years, because of the Essay, which breaks with plays off Crichton s typical form instead of a broken monologue with a human genius, it takes the form of an italicized, nearly stream of consciousness Socratic dialogue with something Again, the writing is problematic Crichton manages to use the word foam 23 times or so in two paragraphs but, even after all these years, the content still stirs me the subject is consciousness and the power and meaning of the question mark again I ll let him do the rest You can and should disagree with his analysis, you can shrug aside his monosyllables, but if something in his notion of What Makes Humanity doesn t stir you, then you are missing out You have finally and irrevocably left the seventh grade, that painful age of wondering, in favor of a well fortified adulthood and as nice as that sounds, you probably left something essential behind Hmmm I may have gotten a little presumptive towards the end there I m sure some very smart people have very good reasons for scoffing at Michael Crichton Allright, let me adjust my position if you read Sphere, and have thoughts, positive or negative, about the Essay, please write me If you know of other works, academic or flippant or otherwise, on the same topic, forward em It happens to be one of my favorite things to discuss Four stars One demit for bad writing, the fact that I haven t read the book in seven years, the undercooked movie, and my general cowardice I would seem SO much smarter if I reserved five stars for Gravity s Rainbow


  4. Trudi Trudi says:

    I had some idea what to expect when I picked up the late Michael Crichton s sci fi thriller Sphere because I d seen the movie years ago a movie I love by the way despite a lot of lambasting from the critics and grumbling from the book s fans Sure it isn t perfect with its moments of cheese and flubs nevertheless, the exciting, chilling core of Crichton s story is evident and for me the film still stands as a great example of escapist cinema, that mesmerizing addictive blend of science fic I had some idea what to expect when I picked up the late Michael Crichton s sci fi thriller Sphere because I d seen the movie years ago a movie I love by the way despite a lot of lambasting from the critics and grumbling from the book s fans Sure it isn t perfect with its moments of cheese and flubs nevertheless, the exciting, chilling core of Crichton s story is evident and for me the film still stands as a great example of escapist cinema, that mesmerizing addictive blend of science fiction and horror But I m probablyforgiving than most One of my favorite movie genres is space horror There s something about the claustrophobic squeeze of the group in peril scenario as it hurtles through the freezing, oxygenless void of space where no one can hear you scream Or the imperiled stranded on an uninhabited, hostile planet where the very environment wants to kill you Alien, Aliens, Moon, 2001 A Space Odyssey, Event Horizon, and Pitch Black just to name a few Sphere is not set in space, but it might as well be It takes the reader deep into the darkest part of the ocean where unfathomable pressure forces threaten to crush and demolish, where the only breathable oxygen is what you bring with you, where the landscape is as alien and inhospitable as anything found in outer space A thriller should thrill It should keep you turning the pages long into the night, white knuckled and on the edge of your seat Horror should unsettle and disturb you, compelling you to look over your shoulder and under the bed for that unnamed threat Science fiction should challenge your concept of reality, bending your mind to what s possible, to what could actually be In Sphere Crichton is firing on all cylinders as a storyteller, accomplishing all three of these seemingly without any effort at all It s such a treat to see an author in this much control of his narrative I read this compulsively, voraciously, rarely coming up for air I can only imagine the inexorable tension I would have experienced had I not seen the movie and therefore knew most of what to expect Even so, the whole experience remained thrilling and deliciously unnerving The pacing is pitch perfect, each devastating reveal coming at the exact right moment Who or what Jerry is becomes a maddening puzzle, his voice and demeanor as terrifying and memorable as HAL 9000


  5. Joe Valdez Joe Valdez says:

    Bullet points seem appropriate when it comes to Sphere, the 1987 science fiction thriller by Michael Crichton One of the qualities about Crichton s work that I love is the unabashed clarity of his concepts and the dependable navigation of his novels Crichton doesn t seem like he s lost or should stop to ask for directions Other writers those with loftier creative ambitions, perhaps tend to circle around ideas like mankind s first contact with extraterrestrials as if they ve never been in Bullet points seem appropriate when it comes to Sphere, the 1987 science fiction thriller by Michael Crichton One of the qualities about Crichton s work that I love is the unabashed clarity of his concepts and the dependable navigation of his novels Crichton doesn t seem like he s lost or should stop to ask for directions Other writers those with loftier creative ambitions, perhaps tend to circle around ideas like mankind s first contact with extraterrestrials as if they ve never been in this neighborhood before Crichton doesn t take the scenic route He accelerates directly to FINISH, usually provoking quite a literary rush Usually Norman Johnson, a 53 year old psychologist, is raced across the Pacific Ocean in a Navy helicopter Skipped from Honolulu to Guam to Pago Pago to wherever he is, Norman is on the FAA s list of crash site teams and has responded to three airline disasters in the last decade The Navy has told him that there s been an airplane crash, but information en route has been murky Out of the blue appearthan a dozen ships eight Navy destroyers, two Remote Vehicle Support ships, a Mission Support and Supply ship and a couple of Oceanic Survey and Research Vessels, including the John Hawes, which Norman is dropped off on Norman is taken to the project commander, Captain Harold Barnes Informed that there were no survivors, Norman is at a loss as to why he was summoned, his specialty being the treatment of psychological trauma suffered by airline crash survivors Barnes notifies Norman that there is no aircraft It s a spacecraft And estimations are that the crash occurred three hundred years ago Norman is here because of a report the National Security Council paid him to write for the Carter administration, recommending contingency plans in the event of extraterrestrial contact Norman s paper, which he considered a joke at the time, was titled Recommendations for the Human Contact Team to Interact with Unknown Life Forms ULF Norman is taken to meet his recommendations Ted Fielding is a 40 year old astrophysicist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pompous but cheerful, he s a science communicator who s appeared on television and is a major advocate of SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence He can t wait to get down to the spacecraft, which is settled only a thousand feet beneath the surface Ted compensates for his perceived lack of accomplishment in his field by hoping this event will be his legacy Beth Halpern is a 36 year old zoologist biochemist at the University of Chicago She s a serious weightlifter and runner Her recent work has been studying cephalopods Her thesis is that if not for their three year life span, octopi might be the dominant intelligence on earth Beth reveals to Norman that Barnes is ex Navy and as a member of the Defense Science Board, advises the Joint Chiefs of Staff on weapons acquisitions Harry Adams is a 30 year old mathematician at Princeton, the youngest but most vital member of the team His job is to communicate with the ULF A prodigy in the field of probability, he has a chip on his shoulder, but is almost always right He theorizes that the spacecraft is view spoiler not from another planet hide spoiler And after the team is briefed by Barnes, Harry confronts the commander for lying to them about divers still searching for the spacecraft door Harry deduces they ve already found it Barnes briefs the team that a Navy vessel laying a fiber optics cable from Honolulu to Sydney hit a snag midway between American Samoa and Fiji The cable was severed by an obstruction Sophisticated side scanning sonar found the obstruction to be a 280 foot tall fin attached to a cylindrical object half a mile long A segment of the fin cut by a remote vehicle and analyzed strongly suggests that the object could not have originated on this planet After two weeks of study, geologists confirmed that the coral around the spacecraft is at least three hundred years old, maybe older If the crew is still alive, the ULF team is to make contact with it In the morning, Norman is piloted down to the ocean floor with Ted, who s already working out what they should say to the ULF They dock at a Navy habitat consisting of five interconnected cylinders where divers have been at work cutting a tunnel to the door Beth and Harry have been joined by Captain Barnes and the Navy staff who support the contact team Tina Chan handles electronics Jane Edmunds is the unit archivist Alice Fletcher is a chief petty officer and support chief Rose Levy is the cook Their genders are not accidental Barnes explains that Navy studies have shown women to be superior to men for submerged operations In a key passage of the novel, the contact team stops before entering the spacecraft to debate each other on the topic of ceremony Edmunds Tape is running Ted I d like to say a few words Harry Jesus, Ted Can t you ever let up Ted I think it s appropriate Harry Go ahead, make your speech Ted Hello This is Ted Fielding, here at the door of the unknown spacecraft which has been discovered Barnes Wait a minute, Ted Here at the door of the unknown spacecraft sounds like here at the tomb of the unknown solider Ted You don t like it Barnes Well, I think it has the wrong associations Ted I thought you would like it BethCant we just get on with it,please Ted Never mind Harry What, are you going to pout now Ted Never mind We ll do without any commentary on this historic moment Harry Okay, fine Let s get it open Ted I think everybody knows how I feel I feel that we should have some brief remarks for posterity Harry Well, makeyour goddamn remarks Ted Listen, you son of a bitch I ve had about enough of your superior, know it all attitude Barnes Stop tape please Edmunds Tape is stopped, sir Barnes Let s everyone settle down Harry I consider all this ceremony utterly irrelevant Ted Well, it s not irrelevant It s appropriate Barnes All right, I ll do it Roll the tape Edmunds Tape is rolling Barnes This is Captain Barnes We are now about to open the hatch cover Present with me on this historic occasion are Ted Fielding, Norman Johnson, Beth Halpern, and Harry Adams Harry Why am I lastThis passage is a snapshot of the novel The dialogue not that great I find it contrived that the team would have a discussion like this while fitted with deep sea diving gear one thousand feet below the surface on the threshold of an alien spacecraft They should be so terrified that snappy banter is beyond them However, based on the egos involved, there is a certain honesty to this exchange In terms of character, Sphere may be the best Michael Crichton has done The behavior of the team feels consistent with their fields and backgrounds I thought it was cool to watch scientists spitball their Neil Armstrong speech That s enough bullet points Now for what I loved and didn t love Crichton takes care assembling a contemporary team of civilian and military professionals to make contact with an alien How would that contingency plan come together Who would you choose to talk to an ULF I found this a damn interesting I d want a computer hacker to watch the alien and detect whether it was violating any security protocols, i.e acting shady Maybe also a musician or comedian to help lighten the mood It occurs to me I m now trying to rewrite Crichton but this is actually a good thing I was invested in the outcome of his story Lots of intrigue at the front Crichton introduces an anomaly and compelled me keep reading until his whatsit was explained What is the alien spacecraft Who s inside it Where did it come from What does it want All in all, the resolution of these questions were not what I expected, but satisfying His brainstorm to position the spacecraft on the ocean floor was a very good one If the situation wasn t terrifying enough, putting the craft in the deep brings another level of unease and dread, as well as opportunity to write about physiology, oceanography and marine biology Jerry, the ULF, view spoiler communicates with the contact team through decoded type on a computer screen hide spoiler and is both fascinating and intimidating One of my least favorite characteristics in any book or movie are characters who demonstrate poor job performance I know that s true to life I just don t want to read about it Several of the team members, namely Ted, propose arguments steeped in ignorance that I felt would be, at best, unprofessional for any garden variety scientist, out of character at worst Ted s knee jerk reaction to anything unexplained is that it has to be alien He manufactures a conclusion waiting for data I don t know jack shit about science but even I caught on that this was a fallacy of logic and inherently dangerous to the team Crichton s dialogue is written with that amateur writer s template where characters incessantly refer to each other by name If I had to take a shot of tequila every time someone said, Norman I d have pickled my liver by page 100 Norman even comments at one point that Beth referring to him by his name is getting on his nerves and indicative of the deterioration of her mind, so maybe this was deliberate on Crichton s part It drove me batty The Navy personnel aren t well developed at all Their view spoiler deaths hide spoiler carry zero currency I guess that I should feel disappointed by a story that view spoiler promises alien contact and doesn t have an alien in it, kind of, but not really hide spoiler but I think that Crichton navigates the first contact obstacle course extremely well In my opinion, most stories involving extraterrestrials take a belly flop into ridiculousness once an alien starts walking around and talking There are a couple of notable examples I kind of like Crichton s take on this and how he didn t try to explain everything Sphere bends human psychology and alien possibility together in ways that thrilled me It is reminiscent of Jurassic Park, but this came first, so perhaps Crichton was using himself as an influence The bottom line for me is that it s a fantastic yarn Sphere was adapted into a big movie in 1998 starring Dustin Hoffman as Norman, Sharon Stone as Beth, Samuel L Jackson as Harry, Liev Schreiber as Ted and Peter Coyote as Barnes Watching this cast act is great fun, but when they aren t working off each other, or Jerry, and stunts have to take over, the suspense flags


  6. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Sphere, Michael CrichtonSphere is a 1987 novel by Michael Crichton It was adapted into the film Sphere in 1998 The story follows Norman Johnson, a psychologist engaged by the United States Navy, who joins a team of scientists assembled to examine a spacecraft of unknown origin, discovered on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean The novel begins as a science fiction story, but quickly transforms into a psychological thriller, developing into an exploration of the nature of the human imagination Sphere, Michael CrichtonSphere is a 1987 novel by Michael Crichton It was adapted into the film Sphere in 1998 The story follows Norman Johnson, a psychologist engaged by the United States Navy, who joins a team of scientists assembled to examine a spacecraft of unknown origin, discovered on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean The novel begins as a science fiction story, but quickly transforms into a psychological thriller, developing into an exploration of the nature of the human imagination 2004 1382 531 9645548659 20


  7. ashley c ashley c says:

    2.5 stars Was debating whether to give it a 2.5 or a 3, with the number changing throughout the book Man, this was Lukewarm Lackluster Disappointing, definitely What I liked Interesting premise that held my attention up until the middle of the book, where improbable things start happening and Crichton failed to make them feel real Slightly dry, witty style of writing, but again, made the dialogue really unrealisticWhat I didn t like Terribly written characters Crichton really overd 2.5 stars Was debating whether to give it a 2.5 or a 3, with the number changing throughout the book Man, this was Lukewarm Lackluster Disappointing, definitely What I liked Interesting premise that held my attention up until the middle of the book, where improbable things start happening and Crichton failed to make them feel real Slightly dry, witty style of writing, but again, made the dialogue really unrealisticWhat I didn t like Terribly written characters Crichton really overdid it on Beth, a woman scientist who has inferiority and self esteem issues and talk a lot about how men is constantly being sexist towards her Crichton has managed to make her into a whiny, insecure, overcompensating person on the issue of her gender Surely acomplex personality can be used as a plot point portrayal of imperfect woman whatever he was trying to achieve than a caricature of a feminist which obviously is basically the author s negative impression of them Pop psychology The whole Norman trying to analyze his colleagues, but failing, because his observations are written by someone who plainly didn t have knowledge of the field If there s anything a psychology student hatethan the type of psychology you see on Facebook. Unrealistic portrayal of emotions, situations, personalities The premise isn t unforgettable, regrettably It s quite underwhelming


  8. Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~ Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~ says:

    Well that was very strange.This book is a combination of psychological thriller and science fiction It follows a group of scientists as they investigate what is thought to be an alien vessel that crashed on the ocean floor.Crichton s musings have a tendency to be deeply speculative of the human condition, but without using language that alienates the audience I can follow his line of thinking easily without getting lost This novel s plot takes a sharp left turn off the path I expected it t Well that was very strange.This book is a combination of psychological thriller and science fiction It follows a group of scientists as they investigate what is thought to be an alien vessel that crashed on the ocean floor.Crichton s musings have a tendency to be deeply speculative of the human condition, but without using language that alienates the audience I can follow his line of thinking easily without getting lost This novel s plot takes a sharp left turn off the path I expected it to take, which isn t necessarily a bad thing It just gave me an odd feeling I wasn t sure how to anticipate what was coming Shit got real weird real quick.The conclusion of this novel was genuinely shocking There were moments here and there where I felt authentic fear I had the urge to keep looking over my shoulder even though the events taking place in the book didn t relate at all to what I was doing in real life But something was keeping me from investing in the characters I just couldn t relate to any of them on a personal level, and I didn t much care who survived to the end of the book It s a well written piece of sci fi, and definitely a novel that fans of the genre can enjoy It doesn t compare to Crichton s Jurassic Park, but still a fun ride


  9. Hayley ☾ (TheVillainousReader) Hayley ☾ (TheVillainousReader) says:

    You look so unhappy right now That is a quote from my boyfriend about my face while reading this I fell asleep while reading this In the middle of the day It also took me almost three months to read Safe to say, I did not enjoy it I absolutely love loved Jurassic Park who doesn t so I was really excited to dive into my second Michael Crichton book Boy was it a let down I m not going to lie, the writing was really good, the science was fun and the characters were likable but boy was t You look so unhappy right now That is a quote from my boyfriend about my face while reading this I fell asleep while reading this In the middle of the day It also took me almost three months to read Safe to say, I did not enjoy it I absolutely love loved Jurassic Park who doesn t so I was really excited to dive into my second Michael Crichton book Boy was it a let down I m not going to lie, the writing was really good, the science was fun and the characters were likable but boy was the plot L A M E I thought this was going to be some upside down, interdimensional travel, alien attack story but it was far from it It dragged on forever and when the action finally started it was really unimpressive REALLY unimpressive I didn t feel the same suspense I got from Jurassic Park, but then again it s Jurassic Park so. I did like that this book was focused on Psychology and that it explored the shadow self, but I thought I was going to be on the edge of my seat Which I was not I was half asleep That being said, what I really love about Michael Crichton s books is that he makes science really fun and explains it in a way that someone who isn t scientifically inclined, AKA me, can understand and really enjoy it I could also laugh at science y jokes like I knew what was going one which made me feel smart and cool So even though this one was a bust I ll still check it his other books Jurassic Park awakened my intrigue for Sci Fy and I m sure he has another spine tingling gem out there


  10. Michael Michael says:

    Read this when I was in high school, and was one of the few times I ve been up nearly all night reading, saying to myself every hour, I need to go to sleep, but then couldn t put it down The movie adaptation was atrocious, so don t judge this story based on the film I always pictured Ted Knight in the role of Ted, not Liev Schreiber though Mr Schreiber is a talented actor The story has a very tense, claustrophobic feel, and rightly so, as the characters are trapped at the bottom of the o Read this when I was in high school, and was one of the few times I ve been up nearly all night reading, saying to myself every hour, I need to go to sleep, but then couldn t put it down The movie adaptation was atrocious, so don t judge this story based on the film I always pictured Ted Knight in the role of Ted, not Liev Schreiber though Mr Schreiber is a talented actor The story has a very tense, claustrophobic feel, and rightly so, as the characters are trapped at the bottom of the ocean.One of my all time favorite quotes about learning vs experience Do you want to understand how to ride a bicycle, or do you want to get on and start riding A very fun read